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Recipe for a “Hot Hand” During March Madness

SwishIt is March Madness and basketball enthusiasts are in hog heaven with a seemingly endless schedule of games that range from blow outs to squeakers, often with  incredible displays of athleticism and talent.  The player who develops the “hot hand” is a wonder to behold.  It is as though anything he or she puts in the air is going through the rim, leaving fans in wonder and disbelief.  How did they do that?!!!

Kevin Barry of WAER Sports at Syracuse University put that question to two sport psychologists– Dr. Jack Lesyk and Dr. Charlie Brown (yours truly)– and produced an engaging story on how a player develops a shooting streak. Spoiler alert:  The physical abilities are already there, it is what goes on between the ears that makes the difference.

Here’s the link to Barry’s audio broadcast: CLICK HERE

Let me know what you think…

Dr. Charlie

Olympian Nick Thoman on Handling Stress


Congratulations to Nick Thoman, who has now earned at spot on the 2012 US Olympic team! Here’s a portion of an interview with Gold Medalist Mel Stewart of SwimSwamTV in which Nick discusses his mental preparation for the Olympic Trials. The interview was conducted at the 2012 Charlotte UltraSwim. Check out SwimSwam.com for more information, video and news of the swimming world, and SwimOutlet.com who sponsored the video.  BTW, Nick, thanks for the endorsement!

3 E-ssentials for Excellence at Olympic Trials and Beyond

3 E-ssentials for Performance Excellence

3 E-ssentials for Performance Excellence

Energy management. All the preparation and hard work is behind you at this point; the key is to manage your energy at the venue so you can perform at your optimal level when it is your turn to compete.  While high intensity focus is a key ingredient of successful performance, sustaining performance over a prolonged period requires alternating intense focus with periods of relaxation and shifting attention.  Mental and emotional recovery between events is as crucial as physical recovery.  If you’re really serious about performing well, take time to be “not so serious,” kick back and relax.  You’ll have more energy when it’s time to ramp up for your event.

Execution.  By now you should have a well-developed performance plan that you have rehearsed countless times.  Your body knows exactly what to do, even if your “thinking mind” may wonder if there is something different that might tweak your performance even more.  You do not need to do anything new or different; simply do what you know and do it well.  Trust your training; trust your body; execute your plan.  Anything new or different at this stage of the game is a recipe for disaster.

Embrace the experience.  Whether you are a seasoned Olympian or a first-time qualifier, you’ve been preparing for this moment all your life. You have earned this opportunity. Embrace the excitement, uncertainty and possibilities that it offers.  Make memories that you can Enjoy for a lifetime.

Options for Uncertainty: Worry, Planning and Curiosity

Worry Is A Waste

Uncertainty is widely accepted by performance experts as one of the most common factors contributing to stress.  The irony is that everything in life is uncertain, except for “death and taxes” (according to Ben Franklin). Whether you are an athlete preparing for the Olympics, a business person attempting to land a major account,  a surgeon preparing to operate, or a young lover contemplating a lifelong commitment — you can feel confident; but there are no guarantees. Not knowing is a part of life.   The attitude and emotion that you bring to the unknown has a major influence on how you perform under pressure.  Consider the emotions driving the three primary paths through uncertainty:  worry, planning and curiosity.

Worry is fueled by fear. It is a succubus to the energy that is required for excellence, and will drain a person of creativity and confidence in dealing with uncertainty.  Worry is a waste.

By contrast, if you take the same uncertainty and wrap yourself in cool, dispassionate logic, you can enter the realm of planning.  You never know exactly what will happen; but  you probably have an idea of situations that would be challenging.  For each situation, decide in advance how you ideally want to respond; then practice that response either by mentally rehearsing your deftly dealing with the distraction, or actually seek out opportunities to practice in real life.

For example, the upcoming US Olympic Team Trials for swimming will be held in a venue rarely experienced by swimmers.  The competition pool has been constructed in the center of the CenturyLink Center, an arena in Omaha that is complete with jumbo-tron scoreboards, spotlights and poolside pyrotechnics whenever a world record is broken.  The swimmers with whom I work have been mentally rehearsing being on center stage, refocusing after fireworks, and preparing for the “long walk” rather than the more familiar short trek from the ready room to the swimming blocks.  A business person may mentally rehearse dealing with a less than cooperative audience, and even recruit colleagues to role play the scenario in a practice situation.  Research has shown that mentally preparing for adversity and distractions improves confidence and performance.  Great performers typically are great planners.

Where worry is fueled by fear, and planning is more dispassionate logic, curiosity has the potential to tap the delightful emotions of anticipation and wonder.  Remember what it was like to see a present wrapped with pretty paper and a bow, not knowing what was inside, but excited with all the possibilities?  At some point in time, your anticipated moment of performance will be your present.  There is a fine yet powerful distinction between worrying how you will perform and wondering how you will perform, fueled by the optimism of curiosity.

Take a moment for this little experiment: Think of an upcoming performance situation, and now start worrying about it. (okay now, don’t just read this; I want you to actually experience this exercise).  Study the muscle tension in your face and brow as you engage in worry.  Now take the same upcoming situation, and mindfully think of it with curiosity.  Study again the muscle tensions in your face and brow.  For most people, there are marked differences between the furrowed brow of worry and the wide-eyed wonder of curiosity.

If you want to replace worry with curiosity, use these physical cues to help develop the habit of curiosity.  It begins with mindfulness.  Periodically check out the muscles in your face when thinking of performance situations.  If you discover any tension that is associated with worry, pause, breathe, and gently raise your brow while wondering about the event in a non-judgmental, inquisitive manner. Enjoy the unknown and all the possibilities the future might bring. Once you master this sequence, practice, practice, practice!

Curiosity didn’t kill the cat; worry killed the cat. Planning helped the cat deal with distractions, and curiosity helped it enjoy the journey.